Writing Blogs

Writing Blogs Most of my blogs will be about a specific category, such as SEO content writing or digital marketing.  However, not all my blogs will fit into one of these categories.  Because sometimes I just write about things that interest me.  Unlike my other blog categories that are driven and serve a purpose.  Which is usually to provide information about a specific style of writing.   The writing blogs section is a miscellaneous category about writing or the English language. My Blogs If you are the kind of person who finds themselves internally correcting your friends grammar when they write, “I want to go their for lunch”…you’re in good company. And as such, I welcome you to add to my blog post, tell me what annoys you most.  OR, share something interesting you with other people who find the English language just wonderful. Or comment on my blogs.

Content writing proof reading and editing tips

Posted by on Jun 23, 2014 in Assignment Writing Blogs, Content Writing Blogs, Writing Blogs | 0 comments

Content writing proof reading and editing tips

It isn’t easy to proof read or edit your own content writing.  Because you know what it is supposed to say and the message you are trying to portray, it is more difficult for you to spot errors.  Mark Twain noted in a letter, “You think you are reading proof, whereas you are merely reading your own mind; your statement of the thing is full of holes & vacancies but you don’t know it, because you are filling them from your mind as you go along.”  Therefore…Read more.

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Writing Services Grammar: Is it there, their or they’re?

Posted by on Jun 23, 2014 in Writing Blogs | 0 comments

Lisa Thomas Writing Services Grammar Patrol strikes again! They’re, there and their must be three of  the most misused words in the English language, becoming more noticeable thanks to the advent of social media. Now that everyone is updating their status on Facebook and Tweeting their thoughts to their followers, it’s become plain that many people are confused by which form of word to use and in which situation. Although some argue that it doesn’t matter because it’s writing for a social media site and not a formal written text, but it does matter.  The less attention we pay to using the correct word, the more we will forget which word we should be using, we essentially dumb ourselves down, and whether you like it or not, people will judge you based on what you write and how you write it. To help you use the correct word, here is a simple explanation of where an when each word is suitable: Their, there and they’re:  Using the correct version of the words is actually pretty straightforward, here are some basic rules to follow: Their – this is the possessive form of the word i.e. “The two boys took their books to school.” There – this can be used to denote a place i.e. “ I’ve put the TV remote control over there” or to state something, such as “There is someone for everyone” or “There are always more questions than answers.” They’re – this is the shortened version of “they are” i.e. “They’re not in at the moment, they’ve gone out.” Put it together and you have: “They’re taking their drinks to sit at the table over there.”   If you’re ever confused about grammar rules why not contact Lisa Thomas Writing Services, I will write an article to answer your question and post it on Lisa Thomas Writing Services Grammar Nazi...

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Writing Services Grammar: Punctuation you never knew existed

Posted by on Jun 23, 2014 in Writing Blogs | 0 comments

Lisa Thomas Writing Services Grammar Patrol strikes again!  This time it is punctuation marks you never knew existed! And just when you think you know everything there is to know about punctuation, you find 13 punctuation marks that you’d never even heard of before:  (Sourced from:  http://www.buzzfeed.com/expresident/13-punctuation-marks-that-you-never-knew-existed) 1.  Dagger (Obelisk): used to cut out superfluous and unimportant parts of your written text. 2. Caret (Up-Arrow/ a Wedge/ a Hat): Caret means “it lacks” in Latin, and it is used to highlight that there is something from the original text. 3. Solidus (Shilling Mark):  Looks like a backslash, but at a much steeper an angle, it is used to separate different values of currency. 4.  Asterism: This mark is used for indicating minor breaks in texts.  Some consider it to also mean “untitled”. 5.  Guillemets:  The marks are often used as quotation marks, particularly in non-English languages. 6.  Because Sign:  This is the Therefore sign on its head, instead of meaning therefore, it means because. 7.  Section Sign: This mark is used to highlight the different sections of a piece of text. 8.  Exclamation Comma: This mark is used as a way of expressing excitement at something without having to end your sentence entirely. 9.   Question Comma:  This mark is used as a way of questioning something without having to end the sentence. 10.   Interrobang:  This fun punctuation mark is a combination of both the exclamation mark and the question mark.  Personally I prefer this to using…?! 11.   Hedera: This pretty punctuation mark is used to mark paragraph breaks in a piece of text. 12.   Pilcrow: Another punctuation mark that is used for paragraph breaks, though perhaps not as pretty as the last one. 13.   Snark (Percontation Point/ Irony Mark):  This is used to indicate a double meaning in a sentence (usually of an ironic or sarcastic nature).   If you have any grammar queries why not contact Lisa Thomas Writing Services, I will write an article in response to your query and place it on my Lisa Thomas Writing Services Grammar Nazi...

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Writing Services Grammar: How to use the apostrophe

Posted by on Jun 23, 2014 in Writing Blogs | 0 comments

Lisa Thomas Writing Services Grammar Patrol strikes again! We’ve all seen signs offering ‘earring’s’ for sale  or read pieces about SME’s or adverts asking for applicants to submit their CV’s. They’re all examples of what I call itchy apostrophe disease, and they drive me up the wall. You may not be affected in quite the same way as me, but then I’m a grammar loser – there are plenty of us out there. And if they’re anything like me, they will avoid buying anything from someone who can’t control their apostrophes. Apostrophes are generally used to show:  *  The possessive – Susan’s car was in the garage so she had to catch the bus to work i.e. The car belonging to Susan. *  When letters have been missed out – i.e . I’ve (I have) you’re (you are ) we’re (we are), or hadn’t (had not), shouldn’t (should not) etc. Generally, it’s the former where people appear to have the most problems and tend to stick apostrophes in willy-nilly on many words ending in s that just don’t need them.  You repeatedly see apostrophe abuse such as CD’s, DVD’s, 1980’s etc. In these examples, the placement of the apostrophe would only be correct if you were talking about something belonging to a CD, DVD or the year 1980. Areas of confusion: Because we’re dealing with the English language, things aren’t always straightforward. The possessive of words ending in s – The business’s accounts were overdue.  Put your apostrophe after the word and add the s, just as you would if the word ended in any other letter. If you are talking about a proper name, such as James, both James’s and James’ would be correct. Plural possessive – if we were writing about a number of businesses with overdue accounts it would be written as the businesses’ accounts were overdue. There is no need to add another s after the apostrophe. It’s and its – this little word causes major confusion because it breaks the rules. Given the examples we’ve discussed, you would naturally think the word it’s means something belonging to it. But it doesn’t. It’s means ‘it is’…something belonging to it is simply its. In the majority of cases, using apostrophes correctly is pretty simple, you just have to remember that it’s and its break the rules.  So make sure you avoid itchy apostrophe disease – or you might find a grammar patrol knocking on your door. If you’re still unsure as to where your apostrophes do and don’t need to go, why not consider having your work proof read?  Lisa Thomas Writing Services informs you of any changes made to your text, highlighting to you where you have used an apostrophe incorrectly and in effect, educating you in the...

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Writing Services Tips: Know your Audience, Know your Purpose

Posted by on Jun 23, 2014 in Writing Blogs | 0 comments

General writing tips from Lisa Thomas Writing Services. When you have a conversation with someone, you adapt the way in which you talk, the vocabulary you use, the formality of your speech etc. to better suit the person you are speaking to and the situation you are in.  When it comes to writing the same rules must apply, the tone, formality, vocabulary etc. that you use in your writing must be well suited to both your target audience and the purpose of the text. The  Audience Once you know who you are writing for, how to adapt the style of your writing should be pretty much common sense. Once you know your target audience, you can start to answer some of the following questions: How much does your target audience already know about your subject?  Understanding what your audience already knows will give you a starting point from which to build upon. How much will they want to know? And how much do you need them to know?  You need to know this regardless of what you are writing, whether it is an assignment or a story.  Understanding how much information you need to put into your writing will help you when it comes to planning your work. If you are hoping to reach a large target audience, then you should write your text to the ‘lowest skilled’ of your target audience, so that you know everyone who reads your work will understand its content and the vocabulary you use. The Purpose Highlighting the purpose of your writing will help you to decide what tone to use, how formal your piece needs to be, how much detail you need to include and how complex your writing should be, amongst other things.  Once you know what your purpose is you should ask yourself some of the following questions: How formal does the purpose require me to be?  For academic or business purposes you will need to be formal, when writing for something like a blog you can be a little more creative. How much detail is required? If you are writing an information booklet, or a PhD thesis, the answer will be that a great amount of details is required.  For something like a sales brochure, however, you might be required to include less information but still plenty of details within a smaller space. This appreciation of the elements of Audience and Purpose will virtually form your writing style for you. And with time, just like we can subconscious vary our conversational styles, you will start to subconsciously vary your writing style, naturally adapting to the style that most suits the needs of the readers and the goals of the text.   If you are writing for a dedicated purpose or audience, you might be under pressure to get it exactly right.  Why not consider hiring professional writing services to help, such as Lisa Thomas Writing Services.  I not only provide proof reading and editing services, but I also provide full writing service and critique writing services. For more information on the writing services I provide please contact me...

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Writing Tips: Avoid Text Speak

Posted by on Jun 23, 2014 in Writing Blogs | 0 comments

Have you ever visited an online forum or logged onto Facebook to be faced with so much text speak that you have no idea what the writer is trying to say? Have you spent what felt like hours trying to de-riddle a text someone sent to you because there are barely any ‘normal’ words in there?  If so, this blog is for you….Read more.

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